Referendum and Alternative Approval Process

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Referendum and Alternative Approval Process overview

Referendum
Assent voting (or referendum) allows electors to vote on whether a proposal would move forward or not. Assent of the electors is obtained if a majority of the votes counted are in favour of the bylaw or question. Assent voting is conducted under the rules that generally apply to local elections.

For certain matters, local governments are required to obtain approval of the electors or participating area approval before the municipal council or regional district board may proceed with its decision. Assent voting can be used as both a form of approval of the electors and participating area approval.

Assent voting is conducted in a similar manner to local government elections and can either be done at the same time as a general local election or by-election or on its own as a stand-alone vote.

Alternative Approval Process
The alternative approval process (AAP) is a form of approval that allows electors to indicate whether they are against a local government proposal moving forward. An AAP enables local governments to directly engage citizens about a proposed bylaw intended to undertake long-term borrowing, a boundary extension, establish a new regional district service or other matter requiring elector approval.

The alternative approval process requires that 10 percent or more of the eligible electors must sign and submit response forms in opposition to the proposed initiative to require the local government to obtain assent of the electors in order to proceed. When this happens the issue is considered significant and the local government has two choices. They may proceed to assent voting within 80 days, or they may put the matter on hold and consider alternatives to the proposed action.

Please check the column on the right to view AAP and referendum archive folders.



Referendum and Alternative Approval Process overview

Referendum
Assent voting (or referendum) allows electors to vote on whether a proposal would move forward or not. Assent of the electors is obtained if a majority of the votes counted are in favour of the bylaw or question. Assent voting is conducted under the rules that generally apply to local elections.

For certain matters, local governments are required to obtain approval of the electors or participating area approval before the municipal council or regional district board may proceed with its decision. Assent voting can be used as both a form of approval of the electors and participating area approval.

Assent voting is conducted in a similar manner to local government elections and can either be done at the same time as a general local election or by-election or on its own as a stand-alone vote.

Alternative Approval Process
The alternative approval process (AAP) is a form of approval that allows electors to indicate whether they are against a local government proposal moving forward. An AAP enables local governments to directly engage citizens about a proposed bylaw intended to undertake long-term borrowing, a boundary extension, establish a new regional district service or other matter requiring elector approval.

The alternative approval process requires that 10 percent or more of the eligible electors must sign and submit response forms in opposition to the proposed initiative to require the local government to obtain assent of the electors in order to proceed. When this happens the issue is considered significant and the local government has two choices. They may proceed to assent voting within 80 days, or they may put the matter on hold and consider alternatives to the proposed action.

Please check the column on the right to view AAP and referendum archive folders.



CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

Please ask your question below.

The following question was asked via Webex messenger during the April 13, 2021 electronic town hall:

Question: Community sewer will allow for development especially of properties near the lake shore. How will the RDOS ensure that environmentally sensitive areas are protected from the impact of this development? I have recently read that the RDOS is considering excluding property owners from the Environmentally Sensitive Development Permit process.

Answer: Kaleden properties within 30.0 metres of Skaha Lake are generally subject to a Watercourse Development Permit (WDP) Area designation, the objective of which is to protect aquatic habitat, enhance, conserve and restore watercourses and their riparian areas. There are no changes proposed to the WDP Area designation at this time. Lakeshore properties within the proposed sewer service area are not within the Environmentally Sensitive Development Permit (ESDP) Area designation.

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    I plan on selling my home in a few years. Does the capital cost loan stay with the property and go to the new owner?

    Reynolds asked 5 months ago

    The capital cost would stay with the parcel and transfer to the new owner.

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    It is great to hear that there are no changes proposed to the WDP area designation. I believe that there are a number of properties along Pineview, Pine, and Ponderosa Avenue that are under the Environmentally Sensitive Permit Area classified as Important Ecosystems. Are there any plans to change the designation or process for development permits for this area?

    Mic asked 6 months ago

    The Regional District is currently in the processing of reviewing the Environmentally Sensitive Development Permit (ESDP) Area designation in Electoral Areas “A”, “C”, “D”, “E”, “F”, “H” & “I” and is considering changes. Information regarding this separate project can be found at the following web-page: https://www.rdos.bc.ca/development-services/planning/strategic-projects/esdp-review

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    Why isn’t the whole community of Kaleden included in this expense ?

    Hunter asked 6 months ago

    The inclusion of a larger area in Kaleden was discussed and financing options were explored. A legal opinion stated the RDOS could only charge the parcel tax to a property that has a sewer main which the property can connect to. Therefore, only those properties located within the initial service area could be included in this expense.

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    If there is more than one property owner are they all eligible to vote ?

    Debby Hall asked 7 months ago

    Assent voting (referendum) is conducted in a similar manner to local government elections. You are eligible to vote if you are registered as: a resident elector (i.e., you live in the regional district electoral area and meet the requirements for residency, OR a non-resident property elector (i.e., you live elsewhere in BC but own property in the regional district electoral area).  

    If there are multiple owners of a parcel of land, only one person may represent the majority of the owners as the eligible non-resident property elector. Eligible resident electors can also vote, in addition to the eligible non-resident property elector.

    Please note, corporations are not entitled to vote.

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    Are all Kaleden residents able to vote on this referendum?

    S. bascombe asked 6 months ago

    Only Kaleden residents within the proposed service area are eligible to vote. Use the service area map to determine whether your property is included.

Page last updated: 20 October 2021, 16:50